Switch

switch-statements are used to simplify a chain of if-elseif statements. Switch statements look a little different in Onyx compared to say C. This is because case blocks are actually blocks, not just jump targets.

value := 10;

switch value {
	case 5 {
		println("The value was 5.");
	}

	case 10 do println("The value was 10.");

	case #default {
		println("The value was not recognized.");
	}
}

#default is used for the default case. The default case must be listed lexicographical as the last case.

fallthrough

case blocks in Onyx automatically exit the switch statement after the end of their body, meaning an ending break statement is not needed. If you do however want to fallthrough to the next case like in C, use the fallthrough keyword.

switch 5 {
	case 5 {
		println("The value was 5.");
		fallthrough;
	}

	case 10 {
		println("The value was (maybe) 10.");
	}
}

Ranges

switch statements also allow you to specify a range of values using ... Note that this range is inclusive on both ends.

switch 5 {
	case 5..10 {
		println("The value was between 5 and 10.");
	}
}

Custom Types

switch statements can operate on any type of value, provided that an operator overload for == has been defined.

Point :: struct {x, y: i32;}
#operator == (p1, p2: Point) => p1.x == p2.x && p1.y == p2.y;

switch Point.{10, 20} {
	case .{0,   0} do println("0, 0");
	case .{10, 20} do println("10, 20");
	case #default  do println("None of the above.");
}

Tagged Unions

switch statements are very important when working with tagged unions. See the tagged union section for details.

Initializers

switch statements can also optionally have an initializer, like while and if statements.